"Your favorite record’s on the turntable
I drop the needle and pray"

Bruce Springsteen - Mary’s Place (via always-been-a-storm7)

(via mickyjones)

So much has been written about those few words at the end that Bob whispers into Charlottes’ ear. We can’t hear them. They seem meaningful for both of them. Coppola said she didn’t know. It wasn’t scripted. Advanced sound engineering has been used to produce a fuzzy enhancement. Harry Caul of The Conversation would be proud of it, but it’s entirely irrelevant. Those words weren’t for our ears. Coppola (1) didn’t write the dialog, (2) didn’t intentionally record the dialogue, and (3) was happy to release the movie that way, so we cannot hear. Why must we know? Do we need closure? This isn’t a closure kind of movie. We get all we need in simply knowing they share a moment private to them, and seeing that it contains something true before they part forever.

- Roger Ebert on Lost In Translation

(Source: ashleybensons, via factoseintolerant)

Airplane! (1980)

(Source: bennyisherp, via factoseintolerant)

"I hope that someday, somebody wants to hold you for twenty minutes straight, and that’s all they do. They don’t pull away. They don’t look at your face. They don’t try to kiss you. All they do is wrap you up in their arms, without an ounce of selfishness in it."

Jenna, Waitress (via versteur)

(Source: wordsthat-speak, via j0-s)

devlikes:

The purpose of life

devlikes:

The purpose of life

(via slothstarlifestyle)

hhiley:

Oh, when you look at me like that, my darling
What did you expect?
I probably still adore you with your hands around my neck
Or I did last time I checked

(via organisedchaosishere)

(Source: asleepymonster, via journeyintonight)

ughticmonkeys:

sexual orientation: THIS FUCKING vIDEO

(via organisedchaosishere)

Why from Tick, Tick…Boom! pretty much defines a moment that I experienced, of standing there and going ‘I’m going to do this and it doesn’t matter what else I think I should do, and it doesn’t matter if I fail.’ 

(Source: willgrahamed, via factoseintolerant)

Charade (1963)

(Source: gingerrogerss, via factoseintolerant)